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  • Anthropologies of Revolution

    Forging Time, People, and Worlds

    Igor Cherstich, Martin Holbraad, Nico Tassi

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    What can anthropological thinking contribute to the study of revolutions? The first book-length anthropological approach to revolutions, Anthropologies of Revolution proposes that revolutions should be seen as concerted attempts to radically reconstitute the worlds people inhabit. Viewing revolutions as all-embracing, world-creating projects, the authors ask readers to move beyond the idea of revolutions as acts of violent political rupture, and instead regard them as processes of societal transformation that penetrate deeply into the fabric of people’s lives, unfolding and refolding the coordinates of human existence.

    “With insightful references to cases around the world, this book advances a brilliant holistic theory that offers credibility and significance to the ways revolutions unfold in culturally specific practices without diminishing their political impact and universal aspirations.” Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi, author of Foucault in Iran: Islamic Revolution after the Enlightenment

    “This fascinating volume opens up new horizons in the study of revolutionary practice. It is difficult to imagine a more important or original work.” David Nugent, author of The Encrypted State: Delusion and Displacement in the Peruvian Andes

    “This book is a truly original (in all senses of the term) contribution to understanding the global and human condition of far-reaching political, social, and cosmological change.” Bjørn Enge Bertelsen, author of Violent Becomings: State Formation, Sociality, and Power in Mozambique

    Igor Cherstich is Teaching Fellow in Social Anthropology at University College London. He is coeditor of the special issue “The Multiple Narratives of the Libyan Revolution,” Middle East Critique. Martin Holbraad is Professor of Social Anthropology at University College London. He is author of Truth in Motion: The Recursive Anthropology of Cuban Divination and coauthor of The Ontological Turn: An Anthropological Exposition. Nico Tassi is Research Associate at the Universidad Mayor de San Andrés in La Paz, Bolivia, and author of The Native World System: An Ethnography of Bolivian Aymara Traders in the Global Economy.

    Disciplines:

    Anthropology 

    Language: English

    ISBN:
    EPUB 978-0-520-97516-3
    Mobi 978-0-520-97516-3
    Paperback 978-0-520-34379-5
    PDF 978-0-520-97516-3

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/luminos.89

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    How to cite this book
    Cherstich, I et al. 2020. Anthropologies of Revolution: Forging Time, People, and Worlds. California: University of California Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/luminos.89
    Cherstich, I., Holbraad, M. and Tassi, N. (2020) Anthropologies of Revolution: Forging Time, People, and Worlds. California: University of California Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/luminos.89
    Cherstich, Igor, et al. Anthropologies of Revolution: Forging Time, People, and Worlds. University of California Press, 2020. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/luminos.89
    Cherstich, I., Holbraad, M., & Tassi, N. (2020). Anthropologies of Revolution: Forging Time, People, and Worlds. California: University of California Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/luminos.89
    Cherstich, Igor, Martin Holbraad, and Nico Tassi. Anthropologies of Revolution: Forging Time, People, and Worlds. California: University of California Press, 2020. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1525/luminos.89




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